Good news or Bad news?

I’m not sure whether this is good news or bad news for me – it certainly has made me think and maybe tomorrow will make me write harder and faster. I am writing a series, but clearly not quickly enough by anybody’s book (Except perhaps George Martin, but I’m not in that league yet.)Maybe someday…

I can remember having just this kind of impatience when I read the first 4 Poldark novels at uni. I finished one at c 4.00pm and just had to get the next from the bookshop in town so that I could continue without having to wait even a day.

How long would you as a reader wait for a sequel?

http://publishingperspectives.com/2014/02/is-binge-reading-the-new-binge-watching/

More inspiring medium?

When I’m struggling on my laptop and my characters have gone awol and the next part of the plot is eluding me would I be more inspired if I was writing on vellum? I wonder? One thing is for sure, then and now, it would have been too expensive to make mistakes. I’d certainly have to learn to get it right first time! Hmmm…

http://englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/parchment-and-vellum.html?spref=fb

Thank you for this, Olivia Randolph

Paying for Cover design – money well spent?

2-second read from the Writers and Artists Yearbook – 2 things a self publishing author should pay for – https://www.writersandartists.co.uk/2014/02/respecting-your-reader-what-services-should-you-be-paying-for-and-why1

I totally agree. So was glad to have a mainstream deal which meant these were done. (But even then an eagle-eyed friend spotted a few errors in the final text.) There could have been many more. As for the cover – I love mine and the designer spent quite a lot of time playing around with ideas I had given to the publisher and producing images to go with them – I saw c 15 options, I don’t know how many he/she discarded before I got a chance to look at them, but the end result (I think) is fabulous.

What do you think?

Another viewpoint – making money from self-publishing.

Why am I interested in this? Two reasons – 1. I like to keep an eye on what is going on in the Indie world, in case I ever decide to go down that route. 2. there are always some interesting points made that can equally be applied to mainstream published books.

For me in this one it is WRITE MORE. I can’t expect to develop a following if I don’t work hard at the writing. And yes I’m not going to push books out at a great rate of knots because I want to make sure they are as good as I can make them and if that means slower progress so be it, BUT it is a reminder that I need to spend more time writing and less wasting time – turn off the internet when I’m writing for example.

But it also raises a question – my publisher has an option of my sequel to Turn of the Tide – I’m happy with that. However I have a body of short stories that perhaps I could / should? put out myself on Kindle.

Any thoughts on that would be welcome.

Thanks to Lindsay Buroker for this article

http://www.lindsayburoker.com/e-publishing/ebook-pricing-worth-vs-making-the-most-money/

E-Books and how to sell them…

Another thought provoking article from the Huffington Post. lots of interesting information from an analysis of sales data for e-books. For Indie published there are strategies to consider here. And a warning NOT to follow the model slavishly if it doesn’t fit your book. Particularly good to note isthe advice not to pad out a book just to get it to the ideal word count.

As a traditionally published author I don’t have that kind of control. However on the plus side – it appears that my title length is good, my word count is good. The current e price is just over $1 too high to be in the ideal price bracket, so a question – should I be encouraging the publisher to discount it? Would that in itself generate more sales? I can see in the US market that a $3.99 price would be much more attractive than the $5.08 it currently sells at. Would a small discount that took it down to $4.99 help?

That would take the UK price down to £2.99 At the moment Amazon has discounted it to £3.08 – I think (though I’m not sure) that because it is Amazon’s discount that I will still get my 10% royalty on the list price of £4.99 i.e. 49p. If the publisher discounts it, then I think (again I’m not sure) that my royalty would be 10% of the sale price – i.e. 29p. Would increased volume of sales make up for that? Good question.

But the fact remains that ranking of the book is a very important factor – so how do I increase that without having to spend all my life on social media? Now that is the best question of all.

And if anyone has some answers for me I’d love to hear them.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-coker/new-smashwords-research-h_b_3278022.html